GAA FAQ's

GAA

Here at Sports Direct, we're passionate about GAA sports, especially hurling, Gaelic football and camogie. That being said, we are aware that Gaelic sports can be a little tough to understand for beginners, and that's why we have put together this helpful GAA guide which answers all of the most frequently asked questions about Ireland's favourite sports. Featuring an in-depth guide to the rules of hurling and Gaelic football, plus a guide to all the GAA kit you need, lots of interesting information about the history of GAA sports and a handy GAA jargon glossary, this guide has everything you need to be an expert on some of the most exciting and fast-paced sports on Earth.

OVERVIEW

What is GAA?

GAA is the Gaelic Athletic Association who are responsible for all of the Gaelic games and sports in Ireland, but the term GAA is often used as a synonym for Gaelic football - one of the two most popular Gaelic sports, along with hurling. Formed in 1884, the GAA also promotes camogie (the female version of hurling), rounders and Gaelic handball, and is a huge influence on everyday life and culture in Ireland, as well as the worldwide Irish diaspora. They promote traditional Irish values and the Irish language, while creating a strong sense of local and national community through their clubs.

Sports Direct GAA FAQ's

RULES, REGULATIONS AND EQUIPMENT

OTHER FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT GAA

Other frequently asked questions about GAA

GAA GLOSSARY

CAID

Another name for Gaelic football.

CAMÁN

Another name for a hurley or hurley stick.

CAMOGIE

The women’s version of hurling.

COUNTY

The separate regions of Ireland (of which there are 32) used by the GAA to split administration of Gaelic games and set up the popular inter-county competitions. Outside of Ireland, GAA teams and administrations like London, New York, Scotland etc. are also referred to as Counties.

CROKE PARK

The headquarters of the GAA and flagship stadium for Gaelic sports, capable of hosting 82,300 spectators, making it the third largest stadium in Europe.

DUAL COUNTY

A county board which plays both Gaelic football and hurling to a similar level. Each county tends to be more successful in one or the other.

DUAL PLAYER

Any player who plays at the top level in both Gaelic football and hurling.

FOOTBALL

In Ireland, ‘football’ always means Gaelic football. The term ‘soccer’ is used for association football.

FOREIGN SPORTS

All non-Gaelic sports which could rival GAA sports, such as soccer, rugby, cricket and hockey. Some of these sports are banned for GAA stadia and until 1971, GAA players were banned from playing or even watching foreign sports.

GAELIC GAMES

Group term for Gaelic football, hurling, camogie, rounders and Gaelic handball.

GOAL

In hurling, camogie and Gaelic football, a goal is getting the ball into the net under the bar and between the posts in the H-shaped goalposts. This is worth three points.

HURLEY

The stick used in hurling.

INTER-COUNTY

The matches that take place between opposing counties in Gaelic games. These match draw the biggest crowds and form the most important competitions.

OVERSEAS UNIT

GAA bodies outside of Ireland.

PANEL

The Gaelic games term for the squad or roster of players a county, club or team has at its disposal.

PÁIRC

The Irish word for ‘park’ regularly used in the names of Gaelic stadia.

PROVINCE

Separate administrative boards control a collection of counties grouped under the four provinces of Ireland – Munster, Leinster, Ulster and Connacht. Britain is also called a Province in regards to GAA, overseeing the ‘county’ teams within Britain.

SIDELINE

The white line along the length of a hurling or Gaelic football field.

SLIOTAR

The small ball used in hurling and camogie.

SOLO

A big part of hurling and Gaelic football, similar to dribbling in soccer. In hurling, soloing is running with the sliotar balanced or bouncing on your hurley. In Gaelic football, soloing is dropping the ball and kicking it back into your hands over and over again while running.

UMPIRES

The four officials in a game of hurling, camogie or Gaelic football, aside from the on-field referee. Their roles include the raising of a flag to indicate a point or goal, indicate which team touched the ball last before it left the field of play and raise any foul play with the referee.